UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING

Physiology is basic to any biomedical sciences course. Consequently the Department offers courses in the Faculties of Medicine, Science and Dentistry. The following provides information on each course taught in 1994 and 1995, listed alphabetically by group taught.

BACHELOR OF MEDICAL SCIENCE

The BMedSc began in 1992 as a consequence of initiatives emanating from the Department. Much of the 2 year course is integrated and selection into the degree is on the basis of performance in the 1st year of the BSc. The departments involved in teaching the BMedSc are Physiology, Biochemistry, Pharmacology, Anatomy & Histology, Microbiology, Pathology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases and Biological Sciences (Genetics). The Department teaches in the core course in 2nd and 3rd year and also offers options in 3rd year.

Human Life Sciences 2

Course description: An integrated core course of the BMedSc. Taught in conjunction with the Depts of Anatomy & Histology, and Pathology. The part taught by the Dept of Physiology covers cell physiology, excitable cell physiology, sensory physiology, motor systems, autonomic nervous system, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiration, kidney, gastrointestinal system, endocrinology and reproduction.

Lectures: 6 per week. The average number given by Physiology is 3 per week.

Practical classes: 6 h per week, of which Physiology averages 2.5 h.

Tutorials: 2 h per week, of which Physiology averages 2 h.

Number of students: 103 (in 1994); 110 (in 1995).

Assessment: By examination (4 at end of each semester, one of which is a Physiology paper of 3 h), practical exams and essays.

Selection into course: The course is a compulsory subject in the BMedSc degree, into which students are selected, after application, on the basis of their 1st year BSc results for qualifying subjects, which are Physics 1 or Physics 1 LS, and Chemistry 1, Mathematics 1 or General Pure Mathematics 1, and Biology 1. Psychology 1 or Computer Science 1 may be substituted for Biology 1.

Textbook: L. Sherwood, Human Physiology: from Cells to Systems, West Publishing Co, 1989.

Course supervisor: Dr Dampney (in 1st semester 1994 and 1995); Dr Morris (in 2nd semester 1994).

Human Life Sciences 3 (Cellular and Molecular)

Course description: This core course is concerned with the molecular and cellular phenomena that underlie general body functions and development which are taught in Human Life Sciences 2. The course is taught principally by the Dept of Physiology, with a contribution from the Dept of Anatomy & Histology. The topics covered are: biological membranes, membrane transport processes, cellular homeostatic mechanisms, signal-response coupling, the cytoskeleton and cell replication and development.

Lectures: 1 per week.

Tutorials: 2 per week.

Number of students: 110 (in 1994), 98 (in 1995).

Academic responsible: Dr Cook (in 1994 and 1995).

Running of Course: Alan Joffe (in 1994 and 1995).

Advanced Neuroscience 3

Course description: The course comprises themes on the molecular basis of synaptic function in the brain and of how the integrative action of these synapses gives rise to perceptual phenomena such as vision. It includes sections on (1) molecular basis of synapse formation and function, (2) visual perception, (3) control of the cardiovascular system, and (4) audition.

Number of students: 10 (in 1994), 20 (in 1995).

Lectures: (Or small group sessions) 4 per week.

Practical work: Will consist of research work in a Laboratory of one of the Lecturers and in the preparation of research essays.

Course supervisors: Prof. Bennett and A/Prof. R Bandler (in 1994 and 1995).

Cardiovascular Function in Sport and Disease 3

Course description: Topics covered are: the heart, regulation of blood pressure, cardiovascular endocrinology, hypertension, vascular biology and atheroma, and sports physiology.

Number of students: 32 (in 1994), 41 (in 1995).

Lectures: 4 per week.

Presentations/tutorials: One per week, conducted in small groups of 8-10 students, supervised by a member of staff assigned to each group, and involve presentation by the students of a set scientific journal papers.

Practical classes: 1 class of 6 h every second week.

Assessment: 1 exam of 3 h (60%), 2 essays (20%), 1 assignment based on practicals and presentations (20%).

Course supervisor: Dr Hoh (in 1994 and 1995).

BMedSc(Hons)

At the end of the 3rd year a student may proceed to a 4th year in any Department involved in the teaching of the degree, provided they are accepted. Students are advised to consult with the particular academic in whose Laboratory they wish to study. Selection into a particular laboratory can be competitive and may depend on local requirements of that laboratory. For more details see section on research courses.

DENTISTRY

Course description: The course includes lectures, with a clinical emphasis, on nerve and muscle physiology, endocrinology, metabolism, reproduction, blood, immunity, kidney, body fluids, gastrointestinal function, respiration, heart, circulation and central neurophysiology. Although most lectures are taken with students enrolled for Physiology 2 Auxiliary, the neurophysiology lectures are given as a separate stream relevant to dentistry.

Number of students: 80 (in 1994), 65 (in 1995).

Lectures: 3 per week, where students attend the same lectures as Physiology 2 (Auxiliary).

Practical classes: 1, of 3 h, every 3 weeks, plus a 1 h follow-up tutorial to discuss results.

Assessment: For each semester: 1 exam of 3 h, 1 essay, 5 practical exercises.

Textbook: R. Rhoades and R. Pflanzer, Human Physiology, Saunders, Philadelphia, USA, Principles of Physiology, 1992.

Course supervisor: A/Prof Gow (in 1994), Dr Frommer (in 1995).

MEDICINE

General course description: Physiology to medical students begins with an introductory course taught with other departments in 2nd semester of 1st year. In 2nd year a full course in basic physiology is then given and in 3rd year, the Department contributes to a joint Neurosciences course and a Clinical Physiology course, both of which are taught in 1st semester in co-operation with the other departments.

Medicine 1

Course description: An introductory course on cell physiology, taught jointly by the Departments of Physiology, Infectious Diseases, Pharmacology and Immunology in second semester of 1st year.

Number of students: 185 (in 1994); 28 (in 1995).

Lectures: 3 per week in 2nd semester.

Assessment: 1 exam of 3 h.

Textbook: W.H. Evans and J.M. Graham, Membrane Structure and Function, IRL Press, 1989.

Course supervisor: Dr Cook (in 1994 and 1995).

Medicine 2

Course description: This course, taught entirely by Physiology, covers kidney and body fluids, gastrointestinal system, nerve and muscle, endocrinology, heart and circulation, and respiration.

Number of students: 270 (in 1994), 199 (in 1995).

Lectures: 4 per week.

Practicals: 7: 5, each of 3 h, and 2, each of 3.5 h.

Tutorials: 7 in total.

Assessment: Per semester: 1 exam of 3 h; also, Distinction essay.

Textbook: A.C. Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology, 8th edn, Saunders, Philadelphia, 1991.

Academic responsible: Dr Cook (in 1994 and 1995).

Running of Course: Alan Joffe (in 1994 and 1995).

Medicine 3

Number of students: 239 (in 1994), 247 (in 1995).

Clinical Physiology with Pharmacology course

Course description: An integrated course taught in 1st semester in co-operation with the Departments of Medicine, Pharmacology, Obstetrics & Gynaecology, and Community Health, which emphasizes those parts of physiology that have immediate clinical relevance by analyzing the physiological abnormalities in several common and important disorders.

Lectures: 46 in total, 2-6 per week in 1st semester, including 10 from Physiology, plus 8 mini-lectures from Community Medicine.

Tutorials: 5, all from Pharmacology.

Assessment: 1 exam of 3 h.

Course supervisor: Dr Mason (in 1994 and 1995).

Neuroscience course

Course description: An integrated course involving the Departments of Physiology, Anatomy & Histology, Pharmacology, Medicine, Surgery, and Psychiatry.

Lectures: 4 per week in 1st semester, with a total of 25 from Physiology.

Practical classes and demonstrations: 11, each of 2 h, from Physiology.

Tutorials and anatomical practical sessions: 23, with 1, of 2 h, from Physiology.

Assessment: Progressive, in 3 stages: 30 min multiple-choice questions; final 2 h theory; 40 min practical.

Textbook: E.R. Kandel, J.H. Schwartz and T.M. Jessel, Principles of Neural Science, 3rd edn, Elsevier, New York, 1991.

Course supervisor: Prof. Sefton (in 1994), A/Prof. Bandler (in 1995).

PHARMACY

Course description: The course is taught in 1st year. The subject matter is intended to complement that in the separate course taught by Biology. The course is designed to provide a broad basic knowledge in areas such as nerve and muscle physiology, endocrinology, metabolism, reproduction, blood, immunity, kidney, body fluids, gastrointestinal function, respiration, heart, circulation and the function of the central nervous system.

Number of students: 175 (in 1994), 197 (in 1995).

Lectures: 3 per week beginning in middle of 1st semester, the first part of the year being taken up with Biology lectures to give students necessary background; 4 per week throughout 2nd semester.

Quizzes: 1 after each lecture topic; i.e., every few weeks.

Assessment: 1st semester: 1.5 h exam; 2nd semester: 2 h exam, each consisting of multiple choice questions of the 5 alternatives, one correct, variety.

Textbook: E.N. Marieb, Human Anatomy and Physiology, 2nd edn, 1992, Benjamin/Cummings, Redwood City, CA, USA.

Course supervisor: Dr Cottee (in 1994 and 1995), Dr Phillips (in 1st semester 1995 only).

SCIENCE

General: Physiology 3, a 3rd year subject, continued until the end of 1993, with the full 16 unit physiology course offered in 2nd year having ceased in 1992. In 1993 repeat students, along with those students who were enrolled before 1992 and were still eligible to do Physiology 2, were accommodated in lectures and tutorials with Science Auxiliary and Dentistry. A proposal by the Department to re-introduce a new Physiology 3 course, and a Physiology 2 (Introductory) course to allow students to proceed to Physiology 3, is currently under consideration by the Faculty of Science. With the re-introduction of Physiology 3, BSc students could then proceed, if accepted, to a 4th year (Honours) course and beyond (see section on Research Courses). The Auxiliary course, which represents a somewhat abbreviated overview of physiology is offered in 2nd year, and is primarily intended for students who will not proceed further with physiology. Nevertheless, as indicated above, the Department proposes to replace this with a Physiology 2 (Introductory) course, which would then become the qualifying course for Physiology 3, as well as being an appropriate course for students who wish to take a broadly-based course in Physiology at the intermediate level.

Physiology 2 (16 units)

Preamble: This course is only available to BSc candidates who enrolled prior to 1991. New students are now only able to take the Auxiliary course, but the Department is trying to ensure that they will be able to continue into a 3rd year course in Physiology if they do well.

Course description: The course includes lectures, with a clinical emphasis, on nerve and muscle physiology, endocrinology, metabolism, reproduction, blood, immunity, kidney, body fluids, gastrointestinal function, respiration, heart, circulation and central neurophysiology.

Number of students: 10 (in 1994), 8 (in 1995).

Lectures: 3 per week, where students attend the same lectures as Dentistry 2.

Practical classes: 1, of 4 h every 3 weeks, plus a 1 h follow-up tutorial to discuss results.

Assessment: For each semester: 1 exam of 3 h, 1 essay, 5 practical exercises.

Prerequisites: 1st year Physics and Chemistry (qualifying courses), a 1st year Mathematics and either Biology 1, Psychology 1 or Computer Science 1.

Textbook: R. Rhoades and R. Pflanzer, Human Physiology, Saunders, Philadelphia, USA, Principles of Physiology, 1992.

Course supervisor: Dr Gow (in 1994) and Dr Frommer (in 1995).

Physiology 2 Auxiliary (8 units)

Course description: This is a service course for students majoring in other subjects. The course includes lectures, with a clinical emphasis, on nerve and muscle physiology, endocrinology, metabolism, reproduction, blood, immunity, kidney, body fluids, gastrointestinal function, respiration, heart, circulation and central neurophysiology.

Number of students: 170 (in 1994), 200 (in 1995).

Lectures: 3 per week, where students attend the same lectures as Dentistry 2.

Tutorials or practical classes: 1 h per week (4 pracs per semester).

Assessment: For each semester: 1 exam of 3 h, 1 essay, 5 practical exercises.

Prerequisites: Nil; may not be taken with Physiology 2.

Textbook: R. Rhoades and R. Pflanzer, Human Physiology, Saunders, Philadelphia, USA, Principles of Physiology, 1992.

Course supervisor: Dr Frommer (in 1994 and 1995).

Physiology 3 (24 units)

Preamble: This course is currently available to BSc students who enrolled prior to 1991, although, as mentioned above, a proposal to re-introduce this course is currently under consideration by the Faculty.

Course description: The course comprises two different themes, one taught in each semester. The 1st semester theme is neuroscience and cell physiology, and covers topics such as membrane conductances and excitability, signal transduction, synaptic transmission, sensory systems, and development and regeneration of the nervous system. The 2nd semester theme is the cardiovascular system and spans topics such as cardiac contraction, signal transduction, circulation, neural and endocrine control of the heart and blood vessels, regulation of fluid volume and composition, hypertension, atherosclerosis and sport.

Number of students: 9 (in 1994), 5 (in 1995).

Lectures: 4 per week.

Presentations/tutorials: 1 per week, conducted in small groups of 8-10 students, supervised by a member of staff assigned to each group, and involving presentation by the students of a set scientific journal paper.

Practical classes: 1 class, of 6 h, every second week.

Assessment: Per semester: One 3 hour exam (60%), 2 essays (20%), 2 assignments based on practicals and presentations (20%).

Prerequisites: Physiology 2 and (i) Biochemistry 2 or Biochemistry 2 Auxiliary or Agricultural Chemistry; (ii) one of: a 2nd year Mathematics, Biology 2, Chemistry 2, Computer Science 2, Physics 2, Anatomy 2 Introductory, Histology 2 Introductory, Pharmacology 2 Introductory, Microbiology 2, Psychology 2.

Textbook: 1st semester: none; 2nd semester: R.M. Berne and M.N. Levy, Physiology, 2nd edn, Mosby, 1988.

Course supervisor: For 1st semester: Dr Martin (in 1994 and 1995). For 2nd semester: Dr Hoh (in 1994 and 1995).

Course organization and day-to-day running of courses

Alan Joffe, as is one of his responsibilities in the Department, has played a major role in the organization and 'hands-on' running of the various courses, particularly all of those in Medicine and the 3rd year of Medical Science and Science. Without his expert assistance and devotion to this considerable task, the efficient operation of these courses would not have occurred.