UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING


Physiology is basic to any biomedical sciences course. Consequently the Department offers courses in the Faculties of Medicine, Science and Dentistry. The following provides information on each course taught, listed alphabetically by group taught.

BACHELOR OF MEDICAL SCIENCE

The BMedSc began in 1992 as a consequence of initiatives emanating from the Department. Much of the 2 year course is integrated and selection into the degree is on the basis of performance in the 1st year of the BSc. The departments involved in teaching the BMedSc are Physiology, Biochemistry, Pharmacology, Anatomy & Histology, Microbiology , Pathology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases and Biological Sciences (Genetics). The Department teaches in the core course in 2nd and 3rd year and also offers options in 3rd year.

Human Life Sciences 2

Course description: The degree begins with an integrated core course consisting of Physiology, Anatomy, Histology and Pathology. The part taught by the Dept of Physiology covers cell physiology, excitable cell physiology, sensory physiology, motor systems, autonomic nervous system, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiration, kidney, gastrointestinal system, endocrinology and reproduction.

Lectures: 6 per week. The average number given by Physiology is 3 per week.

Practical classes: 6 h per week, of which Physiology averages 2.5 h.

Tutorials: 2 h per week, of which Physiology averages 2 h.

Assessment: By examination (4 at end of each semester, one of which is a Physiology paper of 3 h), practical exams and essays.

Selection into course: The course is a compulsory subject in the BMedSc degree, into which students are selected, after application, on the basis of their 1st year BSc results for qualifying subjects, which are Physics 1 or Physics 1 LS, and Chemistry 1, Mathematics 1 or General Pure Mathematics 1, and Biology 1. Psychology 1 or Computer Science 1 may be substituted for Biology 1.

Textbooks: M.H. Ross & L.J. Romrell, Histology: A Text and Atlas, 2nd edn, Williams & Wilkins; A.W. Rogers, Textbook of Anatomy, Churchill Livingstone, 1992; J.E. Anderson, Grant's Atlas of Anatomy, 8th edn, Williams & Wilkins; L. Sherwood, Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems, Harper & Row, 2nd edn, 1993.

Course supervisor: Dr R.A.L. Dampney (in 1995 and 1996).

Human Life Sciences 3 (Cellular and Molecular)

Course description: This core course is concerned with the molecular and cellular phenomena that underlie general body functions and development which are taught in Human Life Sciences 2. The course is taught principally by the Dept of Physiology, with a contribution from the Dept of Anatomy & Histology. The topics covered are: biological membranes, membrane transport processes, cellular homeostatic mechanisms, signal- response coupling, the cytoskeleton and cell replication and development.

Lectures: 1 per week.

Tutorials: 2 per week

Academic responsible: Dr Cook (in 1995 and 1996).

Running of Course: Alan Joffe (in 1995 and 1996).

Neuroscience 3

Course description: This course, which is taught jointly by the Departments of Anatomy & Histology and Physiology, is concerned with the structure and function of the nervous system at the molecular, cellular and integrative level. Some examples of neurological disorders will be discussed. The following topics will be covered: the regional anatomy of the central nervous system; somatomotor and autonomic control systems; the visual, auditory and somatosensory systems; hypothalamus; development and regeneration of the nervous system. The practical component of the course consists of experiments in physiological methods, small group tutorials on neuroanatomy and small group sessions in which students discuss current research papers in a wide variety of subdisciplines of neuroscience.

Lectures: 4 per week.

Practical classes: 8 h per week.

Assessment: 1 exam, spot tests, essays, practical work.

Textbooks: E.R. Kandell, J.H. Schwartz, T.N. Jessel, Principles of Neural Science, 3rd edn, Elsevier, New York, 1991; J. Nolte, The Human Brain: An Introduction to its Functional Anatomy, 3rd edn, C.V. Mosby Co., St. Louis, Washington D.C., Toronto, 1993.

Course co-supervisors: Dr P Martin, Physiology, Dr V Balcar, Anatomy & Histology (in 1995 and 1996).

Neuroscience: Cellular and Integrative (formerly Advanced Neuroscience 3)

Course description: The course comprises a 'hands-on' introduction to neuroscience research covering topics in both cellular (molecular basis of synaptic function) and integrative (visual perception, audition, emotion, pain and cardiovascular control) neuroscience. The course comprises an initial series of lectures (2-3 weeks) during which neuroscientists in the Departments of Anatomy & Histology and Physiology give one or two lectures to introduce their research area.

At the end of this introductory period each student:

i.chooses a laboratory in which to undertake a research project (time commitment of one day/week);

ii.chooses an Integrative Neuroscience topic and participates in a weekly seminar (2-3h) on that topic; and

iii.attends a series of approximately 20 lectures (2-3 per week) on topics in Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience.

Assessment: Research Project, report or essay; Final: 2 h short essay.

Textbooks: The course incorporates very recent information, and no single textbook is deemed sufficiently advanced or up-to-date to be recommended. Students are recommended to make extensive use of monographs and reviews in the medical library.

Course co-supervisors: A/Prof. R. Bandler, Anatomy & Histology, Prof. M.R. Bennett, Physiology (in 1995 and 1996).

Cardiovascular Function in Sport and Disease 3

Course description: Topics covered are: the heart, regulation of blood pressure, cardiovascular endocrinology, hypertension, vascular biology and atheroma, and sports physiology.

Lectures: 4 per week.

Presentations/tutorials: One per week, conducted in small groups of 8-10 students, supervised by a member of staff assigned to each group, and involve presentation by the students of a set scientific journal paper.

Practical classes: 1 class of 6 h every second week.

Assessment: 1 exam of 3 h (60%), 2 essays (20%), 1 assignment based on practicals and presentations (20%).

Textbooks: The course incorporates very recent information, and no single textbook is deemed sufficiently advanced or up-to-date to be recommended. Students are recommended to make extensive use of monographs and reviews in the medical library

Course supervisor: Dr Hoh (in 1995 and 1996).

BMedSc(Hons)

At the end of the 3rd year a student may proceed to a 4th year in any Department involved in the teaching of the degree, provided they are accepted. Students are advised to consult with the particular academic in whose Laboratory they wish to study. Selection into a particular laboratory can be competitive and may depend on local requirements of that laboratory. For details on projects available in the coming year, please refer to Honours Research Projects in 1996 and for more general information, refer to Undergraduate Research Courses.


DENTISTRY

Course description: The course includes lectures, with a clinical emphasis, on nerve and muscle physiology, endocrinology, metabolism, reproduction, blood, immunity, kidney, body fluids, gastrointestinal function, respiration, heart, circulation and central neurophysiology. Although most lectures are taken with students enrolled for Physiology 2 Auxiliary, the neurophysiology lectures are given as a separate stream relevant to dentistry.

Lectures: 3 per week, where students attend the same lectures as Physiology 2 (Auxiliary).

Practical classes: 1, of 3 h, every 3 weeks, plus a 1 h follow-up tutorial to discuss results.

Assessment: For each semester: 1 exam of 3 h, 1 essay, an oral and two written practical exercises.

Textbook: R. Rhoades and R. Pflanzer, Human Physiology, Saunders, Philadelphia, USA, Principles of Physiology, 1992.

Course supervisor: Dr M. Frommer (in 1995 and 1996).


MEDICINE

General course description: Physiology to medical students begins with an introductory course taught with other departments in 2nd semester of 1st year. In 2nd year a full course in basic physiology is then given and in 3rd year, the Department contributes to a joint Neurosciences course and a Clinical Physiology course, both of which are taught in 1st semester in co-operation with the other departments.

Medicine 1

Course description: An introductory course on cell physiology, taught jointly by the Departments of Physiology, Infectious Diseases, Pharmacology and Immunology in second semester of 1st year.

Lectures: 3 per week in 2nd semester.

Assessment: 1 exam of 3 h.

Textbook: W.H. Evans and J.M. Graham, Membrane Structure and Function, IRL Press, 1989.

Course supervisor: Dr Cook (in 1995 and 1996).

Medicine 2

Course description: This course, taught entirely by Physiology, covers kidney and body fluids, gastrointestinal system, nerve and muscle, endocrinology, heart and circulation, and respiration.

Lectures: 4 per week.

Practicals: 7: 5, each of 3 h, and 2, each of 3.5 h.

Tutorials: 7 in total.

Assessment: Per semester: 1 exam of 3 h; also, Distinction essay.

Textbook: A.C. Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology, 9th edn, Saunders, Philadelphia, 1995.

Academic responsible: Dr Cook (in 1995 and 1996).

Running of Course: Alan Joffe (in 1995 and 1996).

Medicine 3

Clinical Physiology with Pharmacology course

Course description: An integrated course taught in 1st semester in co-operation with the Departments of Medicine, Pharmacology, Obstetrics & Gynaecology, and Community Health, which emphasizes those parts of physiology that have immediate clinical relevance by analyzing the physiological abnormalities in several common and important disorders.

Lectures: 46 in total, 2-6 per week in 1st semester, including 10 from Physiology, plus 8 mini- lectures from Community Medicine.

Tutorials: 5, all from Pharmacology.

Assessment: 1 exam of 3 h.

Course supervisor: Dr Mason (in 1995 and 1996).

Neuroscience course

Course description: An integrated course involving the Departments of Anatomy & Histology, Physiology, Pharmacology, Medicine, and Surgery.

Lectures: 4 per week in 1st semester.

Practical classes and demonstrations: (Physiology): 11, each of 2h.

Tutorials and practical sessions: (Anatomy): 23, each of 2h.

Assessment: Progressive: 3, 20 multiple-choice question examinations (30 min each);

Final: Theory, short essay (2h); practical (40 min); Distinction examination optional.

Textbooks: E.R. Kandel, J.H. Schwartz and T.M. Jessel, Principle of Neural Science, 3rd edn, Elsevier, New York, 1991; J. Nolte, The Human Brain, 3rd edn, Mosby, St. Louis, 1993; J. Stone, B. Dreher , and I. Tork, The Neuroanatomist's Colouring Book, 3rd edn, Maitland, Sydney, 1990.

Course supervisor: A/Prof. R. Bandler, Anatomy & Histology (in 1995 and 1996).


PHARMACY

Course description: The course is taught in 1st year. The subject matter is intended to complement that in the separate course taught by Biology. The course is designed to provide a broad basic knowledge in areas such as nerve and muscle physiology, endocrinology, metabolism, reproduction, blood, immunity, kidney, body fluids, gastrointestinal function, respiration, heart, circulation and the function of the central nervous system.

Lectures: 3 per week beginning in middle of 1st semester, the first part of the year being taken up with Biology lectures to give students necessary background; 4 per week throughout 2nd semester.

Quizzes: 1 after each lecture topic; i.e., every few weeks.

Assessment: 1st semester: 1.5 h exam; 2nd semester: 2 h exam, each consisting of multiple choice questions of the 5 alternatives, one correct, variety.

Textbook: E.N. Marieb, Human Anatomy and Physiology, 3rd edn, 1995, Benjamin/Cummings, Redwood City, CA, USA.

Course supervisor: Dr W. Phillips (in 1st semester 1995 only), Dr L. Cottee (in 1995 and 1996).


SCIENCE

General: A proposal by the Department to re-introduce a new Physiology 3 course, and a Physiology 2 (Introductory) course to allow students to proceed to Physiology 3, was passed by the Faculty of Science in 1995 for commencement in 1996. With the re-introduction of Physiology 3 in 1997, BSc students will again be able to proceed, if accepted, to a 4th year (Honours) course and beyond. (See section on Undergraduate Research Courses). (For information on projects available in the coming year, please refer to Honours Research Projects in 1996).

Physiology 2 (16 units)

Preamble: This course is available only to BSc candidates who enrolled prior to 1991. Other students who have been able to take only the Auxiliary course in 1995, will be able to continue into a 3rd year course in Physiology in 1996 if they obtain a minimum of a Credit.

Course description: as per Auxiliary below.

Physiology 2 Auxiliary (8 units)

Preamble: This course will be available in 1995 for the last time, and has no prerequisites.

Course description: This is a broadly-based service course for students majoring in other subjects. The course includes lectures, with a clinical emphasis, on nerve and muscle physiology, endocrinology, metabolism, reproduction, blood, immunity, kidney, body fluids, gastrointestinal function, respiration, heart, circulation and central neurophysiology.

Lectures: 3 per week, where students attend the same lectures as Dentistry 2.

Tutorials or practical classes: 1 h per week (5 pracs per semester).

Assessment: For each semester: 1 exam of 3 h, 1 essay, 5 practical exercises.

Prerequisites: Nil; may not be taken with Physiology 2.

Textbook: R. Rhoades and R. Pflanzer, Human Physiology, Saunders, Philadelphia, USA, 1992; R. Berne and M. Levy, Principles of Physiology, C.V. Mosby Co., St Louis, 1990.

Course supervisor: Dr M. Frommer (in 1995).

From 1996 on - Physiology 2 Introductory (8 units)

Preamble: This is effectively a new course, from 1996, to replace Physiology (Auxiliary). Unlike the Auxiliary course, this course permits students to proceed to 3rd year Physiology and, in addition, has prerequisites, as detailed below.

Course description: This is a general course dealing with the functions of the major human body systems: nerve and muscle physiology, endocrinology, metabolism, reproduction, blood, immunity, kidney, body fluids, gastrointestinal function, respiration, heart, circulation, central neurophysiology, basic neuroanatomy and principles of data analysis.

Lectures: 3 per week, where students attend the same lectures as Dentistry 2.

Tutorials or practical classes: 1 h per week (5 pracs per semester).

Assessment: For each semester: 1 exam of 3 h, 1 essay, an oral and two written practical exercises.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 or Chemistry 1 (Advanced) and Mathematics 1 or Mathematics 1 (Advanced) or Mathematics 1 (Life Sciences) plus two of the following: Biology 1, Biology 1 (Advanced), Computer Science 1, Computer Science 1 (Advanced), Physics 1, Physics 1 (Advanced), Psychology 1.

Textbook: R. Rhoades and R. Pflanzer, Human Physiology, Saunders, Philadelphia, USA, 1992; R. Berne and M. Levy, Principles of Physiology, C.V. Mosby Co., St Louis, 1990.

Course supervisor: Dr M. Frommer (in 1996).

Physiology 3 (24 units)

Preamble: This course is available to BSc students who enrolled prior to 1991, to those obtaining a Credit in Physiology 2 (Auxiliary) in 1995, and to those obtaining a Pass in Physiology 2 (Introductory) from 1996 on.

Course description: This course is run in parallel with the Bachelor of Medical Science course in year 3. First semester entails the study of Neuroscience. Second semester consists of two options: continuing to more advanced neuroscience studies in Neuroscience: Cellular & Integrative or undertaking the study of Cardiovascular Function in Sport and Disease. For details, please refer to the Medical Science, year 3 entries (above).

Prerequisites: Physiology 2 (Introductory) is the qualifying course. Prerequisite courses are Biochemistry 2 or Biochemistry 2 (Auxiliary), plus an intermediate course in one of the following subjects: Anatomy & Histology, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Mathematical Statistics, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Physics and Psychology. Students in the Faculty of Engineering who have completed Physiology 2 (Introductory) plus at least one other intermediate course in one of the above subjects may also be permitted to enrol.

For 1996 only, students who have completed Physiology 2 (Auxiliary) but who have not completed the other prerequisites for Physiology 3 will be permitted to enrol in Physiology 3, provided they have achieved a pass at the level of Credit or better in Physiology 2 (Auxiliary).


Course organization and day-to-day running of courses

Alan Joffe plays a major role in the organization and 'hands-on' running of the various courses, particularly all of those in Medicine and the 3rd year of Medical Science and Science.


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